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Recognizing Phenomena

 

Eugen Oetringer suggests that a vital element for improving project success rates is the ability to recognize phenomena in complex systems and to guide organisations to the effective techniques for these phenomena.     

Example: During our daily commute, we experience capacity bottlenecks as traffic jams and queues. Navigation systems show us one of multiple capacity management techniques, the alternative route. However, in the virtual world of IT tools, processes, directives and best practices, countless traffic jams are not recognized as such. We accept their consequences in the form of project delays, insufficient project results, project failures and burnouts. 

Further phenomena are: 

  • Tipping points beyond which well-working practices become counterproductive
  • The tipping point beyond which a project becomes executable
  • The tipping point beyond which project failure becomes imminent
  • Environments changing more quickly than testing can be done and strategies can be updated
  • The endless number of testing scenarios versus organizations unable to afford all the required testing 

In today’s world, employees can intuitively recognize when a project gets hit by these phenomena and reduce contribution to the minimum required. The good news is, effective techniques to deal with these phenomena are waiting to be applied, no rocket science needed.

 



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Subject Matter

Execution
 

About the Contributor:

Attributed Author

Eugen Oetringer

Eugen Oetringer is a Senior Analyst/Strategist for the most complex challenges. Confronted with high project failure rates in an IT environment of 100.000 employees, he did open analysis. It delivered new insights hiding behind the symptoms of failure. In turn, it delivered results where multiple attempts with popular solutions approaches had failed, from bridging an internal communication gap with 30.000 employees to daily emotional outbursts (ADHD) down to one in ten years.
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